Eating for Life

August 29, 2012 by  
Filed under Healthy Life Articles

2947887221 e7b4dfff4a m Eating for Life
by suttonhoo

Eating for Life

Article by Carol Bond

Eating for Life - Food

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By making the right food choices, you may reduce your risk of developing cardiovascular disease and cancer. These diseases take the lives of more Americans than all other illnesses and causes of death combined. Each day, three out of every four deaths in the United States will occur as a result of cardiovascular disease or heart disease (like heart attacks and strokes) and cancer. Although no diet can ensure you won’t have a heart attack, stroke or cancer, what you eat can affect your health. How does a person eat for life? It’s easier and more enjoyable than you might think. There are seven basic guidelines: * Eat a variety of foods. * Maintain desirable weight. * Avoid too much fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol. * Eat foods with adequate starch and fiber. * Avoid too much sugar. * Avoid too much sodium. * If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation. This article focuses on five guidelines that are related to the prevention of heart disease and/or cancer: eat a variety of foods; maintain desirable weight; avoid too much fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol; eat foods with adequate starch and fiber; and avoid too much sodium. Keep in mind that staying healthy requires more than just good nutrition. Regular exercise, getting enough rest, learning to cope with stress, and having regular physical checkups are important ways to help ensure good health. How Do the Foods We Eat Affect Our Chances of Getting Cancer and Heart Disease? There is much still to be learned about the relationship between the foods we eat and our risk of getting cancer and heart disease. To reduce your blood cholesterol level, it is important to eat less saturated fat and cholesterol. Saturated fat and cholesterol are often found together in foods. Saturated fat in the U.S. diet is provided primarily by animal products such as the fat in meat, butter, whole milk, cream, cheese, and ice cream. There are a few vegetable fats-coconut oil, cocoa butter, palm kernel and palm oils which are also high in saturated fat. Cholesterol is found only in animal products eggs, meat, poultry, fish and dairy products. Plant foods such as vegetables, grains, cereals, nuts, and seeds do not contain cholesterol. A few foods are high in cholesterol but relatively low in fat-for example, egg yolks and liver. Watch out for items in the grocery store that are labeled “no cholesterol” or, “contains no animal fat.” They may still contain a large amount of fat or saturated fat. Examples are peanut butter, solid vegetable shortening, nondairy creamer, and baked products like cookies, cakes, and crackers. For people trying to lose blood cholesterol level, these foods should be chosen less often. Substituting unsaturated fatty acids (which are usually liquid and usually come from plant sources) for saturated fats can help reduce high blood cholesterol. Safflower, corn, soybean, olive, and canola oils are major sources of unsaturated fats. The omega-3 fatty acids which are found in fish and seafood may have a favorable effect on blood fat and reduce the risk of heart disease. The National Cancer Institute estimates that about 80 percent of all cancers may be related to smoking, diet, and the environment. Studies at the National Cancer Institute suggest that eating foods high in fiber may reduce risks of cancers of the colon and rectum. Good sources of fiber are whole grain breads and bran cereals, vegetables, cooked dry peas and beans, and fruits. Some studies have suggested that fat may act as a cancer promoter (an agent that speeds up the development of cancer). There is some evidence that diets rich in vitamin A, vitamin C, and beta-carotene (the plant form of vitamin A) may help reduce the risk of certain cancers. Scientists recommend that you eat a variety of foods rich in vitamins rather than relying on vitamin supplements. Good sources of vitamin A include yellow-orange vegetables such as carrots, winter squash, sweet potatoes and pumpkin; and yellow-orange fruits such as peaches, cantaloupes and mangoes. Sources of vitamin C include dark-green leafy vegetables such as kale, spinach, and watercress; broccoli and asparagus; and tomatoes. Some fruit sources of vitamin C are oranges, lemons, grapefruit, peaches, berries, and cantaloupe. Eating for life doesn’t mean giving up your favorite foods. It means taking steps to choose more often foods that are low in fat and high in fiber. For example, if you enjoy eating steak, choose a low-fat cut such as round steak, trim off the excess fat, broil it, and drain off the drippings. Pizza? To try a low-fat version that is rich in fiber, use a whole-grain English muffin or pita bread topped with part-skim mozzarella, fresh vegetables, and tomato sauce. And cookies or other desserts? In many recipes you can reduce the fat, and substitute vegetable oils or margarine for butter. To increase fiber, use whole wheat flour in place of white flour. To assure an adequate diet, choose a variety of foods daily including selections of vegetables; fruits; whole-grain breads and cereals; low-fat dairy products; poultry, fish, and lean meat, dry beans and peas. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the National Cancer Institute are committed to promoting good health and reducing the loss of life from heart disease and cancer. You can help. By using the ideas in this article, trying recipes that have been modified to decrease fat and sodium and increase fiber, and planning menus that are high in fiber and low in fat, especially saturated fat, you may reduce the risk of these diseases for yourself and for those you love. So Eat Well, Eat Healthy… And Eat For Life!

This article is provided by Carol Bond Health Foods. Carol Bond Health Foods has been serving natural health consumers for over 25 years. For the best vitamin supplements and health foods visit http://www.CarolBond.com.

About the Author

Howard and Carol Bond were in a Houston shopping mall in the year 1976. At a health food store, they were intrigued by the health-related possibilities of the vitamins and supplements on the shelves. Howard had achieved a substantial background in human anatomy, and Carol had studied the effectiveness of nutritional care. Based on conversations with the representative in the health food store, both Howard and Carol began a regimen. They quickly

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Carol Bond

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Howard and Carol Bond were in a Houston shopping mall in the year 1976. At a health food store, they were intrigued by the health-related possibilities of the vitamins and supplements on the shelves. Howard had achieved a substantial background in human anatomy, and Carol had studied the effectiveness of nutritional care. Based on conversations with the representative in the health food store, both Howard and Carol began a regimen. They quickly












Use and distribution of this article is subject to our Publisher Guidelines
whereby the original author’s information and copyright must be included.

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